Conditional Sentence : Implied Condition

Implied Condition
Implied Condition is one form of Conditional Sentences. That in this form, the real meaning is implied. But although it is implied, its meaning is still the same. In other words, there will be more than one sentences with one meaning in the same.

In its use, “if clause” is usually in the form of implicit, neither explicit nor stated.

(a) I would have gone with you, but I had to study.
(Implied condition : … if I hadn’t had to study)
(b) I never would have succeeded without your help.
(Implied condition : … if you hadn’t helped me) Often the “if clause” is implied, not stated. Conditional verbs are still used in the “result clause”.
(c) She ran; otherwise, she would have missed her bus. Conditional verbs are frequently used following otherwise. In (c), the implied “if clause” is: If she had not run, ….

From the results of analyzing the existing examples, authors concluded that the implied condition only used for contrary to fact event. Either in the past or future form.

Example 1:
a. She would have missed her bus, but she ran.
b. She ran. Otherwise, she would have missed her bus.
The Implied condition
c. She would have missed her bus if she hadn’t run.
d. If she hadn’t run, she would have missed her bus.
Example 2:
a. I never would have succeeded without your help.
b. I never would have succeeded, but you helped me.
The Implied condition
c. I never would have succeeded if you hadn’t helped me.
d. If you hadn’t help me, I never would have succeeded.
Analysis:
– The “result clause” is not changing, and the “if clause” is changing.
– When the “but …” transform into “if …” its followed by tenses transformation also. (Past tense into Past perfect).
– The transformation above also followed by the sentence value transformation. (Positive into negative, and in the contrary).

About lynxdeby
I'am a university student in STAIN Palangka Raya in English Departement, interested in global netting and computerization.

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